NewView™ 7100

The NewView™ 7100 white light interferometer (profilometer) provides affordable versatility in non-contact optical surface profiling. With powerful tools for characterizing and quantifying surface roughness, step heights, critical dimensions, and other topographical features with excellent precision and accuracy, all measurements are nondestructive, fast, and require no sample preparation. Profile heights ranging from < 1 nm up to 20000 µm, at high speeds, independent of surface texture, magnification, or feature height!
Using ZYGO's Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI) technology, the NewView™ 7100 3D optical surface profiler easily measures a wide range of surfaces, including smooth, rough, flat, sloped, and stepped surfaces.
Performance, Value, and Versatility
The NewView 7100 offers high-accuracy measurements, ease of use, and a wide variety of applications all at an attractive price point that make it the ideal choice for affordable versatility in 3D optical profilers.

Key Features:
• Fast non-contact measurements
• Sub-angstrom Z resolution
• Leading-edge precision & gage capability
• Enhanced optical imaging

Equipment for goniometric laser scattering

Light scattering can be thought of as the deflection of a ray from a straight path, for example by irregularities in the propagation medium, particles, or in the interface between two media. Deviations from the law of reflection due to irregularities on a surface are also usually considered to be a form of scattering. When these irregularities are considered to be random and dense enough that their individual effects average out, this kind of scattered reflection is commonly referred to as diffuse reflection. Most objects that one sees are visible due to light scattering from their surfaces. Indeed, this is our primary mechanism of physical observation. Scattering of light depends on the wavelength or frequency of the light being scattered. Since visible light has wavelength on the order of a micrometre, objects much smaller than this cannot be seen, even with the aid of a microscope. Colloidal particles as small as 1 µm have been observed directly in aqueous suspension.

Luminescence measuring device

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Luminescence emission occurs after an appropriate material has absorbed energy from a source such as ultraviolet or X-ray radiation, electron beams, chemical reactions, and so on. The energy lifts the atoms of the material into an excited state, and then, because excited states are unstable, the material undergoes another transition, back to its unexcited ground state, and the absorbed energy is liberated in the form of either light or heat or both (all discrete energy states, including the ground state, of an atom are defined as quantum states). The excitation involves only the outermost electrons orbiting around the nuclei of the atoms. Luminescence efficiency depends on the degree of transformation of excitation energy into light, and there are relatively few materials that have sufficient luminescence efficiency to be of practical value.

Interferometric measuring device

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Interferometry is a family of techniques in which waves, usually electromagnetic, are superimposed in order to extract information about the waves. Interferometry is an important investigative technique in the fields of astronomy, fiber optics, engineering metrology, optical metrology, oceanography, seismology, spectroscopy (and its applications to chemistry), quantum mechanics, nuclear and particle physics, plasma physics, remote sensing, biomolecular interactions, surface profiling, microfluidics, mechanical stress/strain measurement, and velocimetry.
Interferometers are widely used in science and industry for the measurement of small displacements, refractive index changes and surface irregularities. In analytical science, interferometers are used in continuous wave Fourier transform spectroscopy to analyze light containing features of absorption or emission associated with a substance or mixture. An astronomical interferometer consists of two or more separate telescopes that combine their signals, offering a resolution equivalent to that of a telescope of diameter equal to the largest separation between its individual elements.