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Program Content for EuroWorkshop

EWORK-PHYSBIO1

The most promising scientific concept to be explored in the school in 2002 is that of connecting on the dynamical level structure to function in modern molecular and cellular biology. In the session of 2003 the central theme is to explore and expand the domains of applicability of the techniques of continuum descriptions, which have advanced tremendously in the last decades, to a multitude of equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems (granular media, soft matter).

 
Scientific director: Jaume Casademunt (Barcelona, Spain)
Local Organizer: V. Krinsky (INLN, Nice/Francey)valentin.krinsky@inln.cnrs.fr
Local Organizer: J.-L. Beaumont (INLN, Nice/France)jean-luc.beaumont@inln.cnrs.fr
Title: Non-equilibrium in Physics and Biology
This workshop is the first network meeting of the EU RTN Network Nonequilibrium Physics from Complex Fluids to Biological Systems.
The subject covers: The field of non-equilibrium physics is at the interface between the area of pattern formation in complex fluids and the rapidly developing and promising area of physical approaches to biological problems. The initiative participates in a world wide trend of expansion of non-equilibrium physics towards complex systems and in particular to biological materials and phenomena, widely regarded as the next major frontier in non equilibrium physics. With the advent of new and revolutionary techniques, which allow observation, manipulation and measurement at the molecular scale, the living cell has opened to the eyes and hands of physicists as an exciting new universe. Outstanding questions in this realm are beginning to become well-posed problems, amenable to experimentation, quantitative modeling and creative insight with the methods of physics. Examples of problems in this context, which will be studied include collective effects of molecular motors, morphogenesis, active membrane dynamics, logical circuits with live neurons, or force generation in artificial cells.

 




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